Other Games Your Favourite New RPG in 2018

First Age

D&D h@ck3r and Hopepunk
Staff member
#1
Did you get a new game onto your shelf during 2018, or did you play a new one? Choose one or more and tell us why it was fab or stood out?

Towards the top of my pile I'm going to go with Forbidden Lands, a Fria Ligan produced game of reavers in a hex crawl of a post apocalyptic fantasy. Some nice twists to the tropes, an RQ level of brutality, great production values and an all round top game. Really well done. So much so I got it out onto the table for some actual play!

Genesys - just squeezes in to 2018 and has really impressed me. Great generic game and will enjoy running more of this. Terrinoth, I should do some more, Android will get out there.

Vagabonds of Dyfed - a surprise late hit for me. A 'one move' PbtA game with lashings of OSRy feel. I just think it could be a really good quick play hit for me, Magpie-like it picks out some nice touches from a number of games and blends. It will see plenty of action next year, including the excellent Zenobia game and setting, which I have stumbled on.

It was inevitable that I would eventually join the Forged in the Dark bandwagon by picking up Scum and Villainy, a great 'Firefly Keep on Flying', take on the elegant mechanics that delivers something in an already crowded spacebar for me.

Everywhen - this continues my 'Barbarians of Lemuria' enjoyment with a new edition that hits my Savage Worlds sweet spot for a light, simple, generic, cross genre system. It will have to argue with Cypher, Genesys and Wordplay to get some table time, but I include here because it is really good and deserves to get on the table. I'm picking up all the genre packs.

I've added to many of my core collections this year, but I'm not counting them in this post, though they have been filled with beauty and quality.
 
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Dom

Administrator
#3
I'll bite:

Delta Green - Yes, the Agent's Handbook shipped the previous year, but the final version of the Handler's Guide landed this year. A streamlined D100% system, this is very well written and illustrated and works very slickly. I enjoyed running it at North Star, albeit from a spiral bound printout of the final pdf.

Forbidden Lands - I really like the way that this one is put together, for similar reasons to @First Age. I hope to play or run this soon.

The Sword, The Crown and the Unspeakable Power - a brutally effective PbtA game aimed to create PVP blood operas in the style of Game of Thrones. I've posted at length about this one in another thread but facilitating this bloodbath at Furnace was definitely a high point.

Legacy: Life Amongst the Ruins was a game that I missed the Kickstarter campaign for the second edition, and even that annoyed me (as I bought the first edition a few months before that happened), but I've pretty much managed to pick all the stuff up. The game plays on two levels - character and family - and is designed to consider multigenerational play. It looks gorgeous and I'm looking forward to getting it to the table at Revelation.

Spire: The City Must Fall Drow terrorists fighting off their high elf oppressors in a mega-city in a lovely blend of fantasy, technology and magic. I like this and am musing on running a short campaign of it.
 

First Age

D&D h@ck3r and Hopepunk
Staff member
#4
Spire: The City Must Fall Drow terrorists fighting off their high elf oppressors in a mega-city in a lovely blend of fantasy, technology and magic. I like this and am musing on running a short campaign of it.
I managed to resist this marvellous looking game at Dragonmeet. This may continue to be one that I play rather than have on the shelf. The game we played (was it Furnace?) was also good fun.
 

Dom

Administrator
#5
I think that you played Spire at Furnace.

The obvious missing game from my list is City of Mist. I so wanted this to be good as it touches a lot of favourites for me (noir, low powered super-heroes, and mythic impacts on reality). However, the old-style telephone directory-sized book that crashed through the door, inadequately packed and impracticable to hold, really dampened my enthusiasm. I've since reprinted it at a smaller size so it is handleable, but my enthusiasm has dipped. A PbtA game with shades of FATE, it looks gorgeous. However, even the game I played at Continuum was with the starter rules (which are different) and no-one is offering it, even at Revelation.
 
#6
New for me in 2018:

This for me was mainly the year of setting and adventure material, ahead of mechanics. My favourite new adventure was Oaths of the Riddermark (for the One Ring). In terms of a pure setting book, Cthulhu City stood out. Space 1899 (newly read properly, though it's been on my shelf for a while), Spire, and Delta Green are RPGs which charmed me on the basis of setting and possibilities, and all sparked ideas. In terms of system, they seem decent, but system isn't the draw for me (though in Spire it looks like it will drive play quite strongly).

In terms of system, The Dying Earth RPG and Burning Wheel Gold impressed me, and both were new to me. I've actually played some Burning Wheel Gold online; my goodness it's good for chewy character-driven stuff with moments of tenseness. The Dying Earth RPG is charmingly written, and enticing. I want to run it but it scares me.
 

Dom

Administrator
#7
Dying Earth terrifies me as a GM as well. I own everything for it, but find it intimidating as I doubt I'd reach the level of droll humour it aspires to. I suspect that it's the kind of game that will have a huge rush for sign-up at a convention if it is offered.

Cthulhu City is brilliantly different. I really enjoyed rolling it out at Furnace.
 

First Age

D&D h@ck3r and Hopepunk
Staff member
#8
In terms of system, The Dying Earth RPG and Burning Wheel Gold impressed me, and both were new to me. I've actually played some Burning Wheel Gold online; my goodness it's good for chewy character-driven stuff with moments of tenseness. The Dying Earth RPG is charmingly written, and enticing. I want to run it but it scares me.
Whoa, Burning Wheel Gold! Never got the Glittery version, but really enjoyed the game for a brief run.
 

Dom

Administrator
#9
I loved your Middle Earth Erebor based game of Burning Wheel (wish it could see publication for say, The One Ring ;-) ) and Newt ran a brilliant Stalingrad inspired game with Dwarves and more. Some super ideas in the system, but ultimately I found it too clunky.
 
#10
It usually takes me several years before I get round to running games I buy; witness the fact that the main game I ran in 2018 was the 2009 published Cthulhu Invictus and particularly the 2011 campaign The Legacy of Arrius Lurco.

Arriving at the end of December, but in time for 2019 commitments I have made, is LexOccultum. I'm looking forward to an opportunity to try a very non-BRP rules setting for investigative games, alongside some interesting C18th history, and some important lessons about European co-operation and shared cultural values... :)

I've continued to back Mythras, adding Constantinople and Waterlands to my collection.
I've returned to the dungeon with 13th Age as my dungeon crawler of choice, adding Book of Demons and Book of Ages. I'm starting to imagine running a campaign - maybe at Patriot Games...
Symbaroum and The One Ring have both taken large amounts of my money in building a very nice collection; maybe I'll game with them one day, maybe I won't! :-(

I backed both Ruma: Dawn of Empire and Vagabonds of Dyfed to try harder at understanding why all you trendy types rave about PbtA!

A Far Off Land is a lovely FATE setting with lots of bits of familiar mythology which should lend itself to a one-off or short campaign.

Forbidden Lands has arrived and I've managed to get into a semi regular game of it - Hurrah! :)
 
#11
Fria Ligan's Forbidden Lands was an absolute blast, though we failed to achieve the mandatory TPK during our first outing. Those diseases and enemies pulled their punches for the Christmas season, it seems.

Guy Milner also ran Cubicle 7's revamped but still true to form Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Play 4th Edition at GoPlayLeeds, I missed it but did enjoy my play in Evil Gaz's run of the game at Furnace 2018.
 
#12
Scum and Villainy is an RPG I am yet to run or play, but I fell in love with the classic black and white heroic comicbook art, since quality art is important in deciding my collectible choices. The game system also reads easy, and I was seriously inspired to run my favorite Persian/Arabesque space opera powered by Scum and Villainy for Revelation 2019.
 
#14
There were a whole load of new RPGs for me in 2018, which will have a variety of long term impacts:

Manifold started the year off, as Simon Burley sent me his play-test rules to have a go at. I ran games of Manifold all year, at every con that I went to, and it's really starting to feel comfortable. Even if the dice roll distribution makes my brain ache. Now Simon just has to get it in print! Looking forward to this featuring heavily in 2019 and beyond, I hope.

NoirWorld was a new (err, well, still waiting for the physical KS books to come) game I ran (facilitated?) at Continuum, and it was really good fun. Played like a PbtA Fiasco. So good I'm going to run it at every opportunity this year, until it bites me and have to go sulk.

Blades in the Dark was one I played for the first time, also at Continuum. Good fun, but I think I'd need to try and get my home group to play it to get the proper experience. Maybe this year?

Is It A Plane?! was the surprise game of the year, first entering my awareness with the Kickstarter during Expo, and then the final physical bits dropping through my door just before New Year. A game that I haven't even played properly yet, just a quick test game of the early quick-start rules. However it still took up a huge amount of time through Q3 and has ended up with my name on the credits page as an editor. Anyone at ConTingency on Wednesday night is invited to come and join in trying this game out. 'Pictionary the Superhero RPG' is my elevator pitch. If I can't work out what the rules say, I really do only have myself to blame!

Honourable mentions to: Monkey 2nd edition (does it count as new?), Fiasco (good fun), D&D 5e (my first encounter with this edition), Fate (first time running)/FAE (first time playing and running), and lots of other Kickstarter games...
 
#15
Manifold started the year off, as Simon Burley sent me his play-test rules to have a go at. I ran games of Manifold all year, at every con that I went to, and it's really starting to feel comfortable. Even if the dice roll distribution makes my brain ache. Now Simon just has to get it in print! Looking forward to this featuring heavily in 2019 and beyond, I hope...
Bless you!

Is It A Plane?! was the surprise game of the year, first entering my awareness with the Kickstarter during Expo, and then the final physical bits dropping through my door just before New Year. A game that I haven't even played properly yet, just a quick test game of the early quick-start rules. However it still took up a huge amount of time through Q3 and has ended up with my name on the credits page as an editor. Anyone at ConTingency on Wednesday night is invited to come and join in trying this game out. 'Pictionary the Superhero RPG' is my elevator pitch. If I can't work out what the rules say, I really do only have myself to blame!...
I know the designer of IIAP. He calls himself my "Game Design Nephew". He is really bright with great new ideas bubbling out all over the place. I've played it ONCE. At my local games club in the "mix up" game between old campaigns finishing and new ones starting we had multiple tables all running IIAP games in different settings and genres but with a multiverse spanning threat which led to some characters swapping tables/universes. Not all the games were Superhero.

I was in a Zombie apocalypse world run by a young referee. I think it was his first TTRPG refereeing ever and it was great.

I was surprised at how tactical and technical the game is. It's so much more than "Pictionary" the RPG. The selection of panel sizes and alignment and conveying the information which gets the referee to slot them in where you want rather than elsewhere is fascinating. It's a really clever piece of work. A proper game.

Look I know it's egotistical and self centred but you know what I'm going to say. My game of the year is, of course, one of mine.

THE CODE OF WARRIORS AND WIZARDRY. Produced as a palate cleanser following my abortive flirtation with Kickstarter for my Anime game - on zero budget with public domain artwork - I'm actually pleased how well it plays. And the full colour hardback - whilst far from professional - looks pretty bloody good in my humble opinion. And though it didn't win and nobody else seems impressed, it WAS nominated as best new RPG and the Expo awards. Surely that means something?

Of course I don't play it as much as I'd like. For technical/promoting the hobby reasons I tend to play The Black Hack to give newbies a proper D&D experience.

Maybe when the new campaigns roll around at my local club I should run a full campaign?
 
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