Forbidden Lands

First Age

D&D h@ck3r
Staff member
#1
This is a 'getting excited about running a game' post. Forbidden Lands is the game I would like to run next. There is currently no room in the Thursday night schedule, so I have decided to run this every three weeks or so on Sundays, 11 to 4ish. If I keep to this cadence then there'll be a small contribution per person for the inevitable pizzas and snacks.




Welcome to Forbidden Lands. In this tabletop roleplaying game, you are not heroes sent on missions dictated by others – instead, you are raiders and rogues bent on making your own mark on a cursed world. You will wander the wild lands, discover lost tombs, fight monsters, and, if you live long enough, build your own stronghold to defend. During your adventures, you will uncover the secrets of dark powers lurking in the shadows and, in the end, you can be the ones to decide the fate of the Forbidden Lands.

This fantasy adventure game uses the simple Fria Ligan system as found in Coriolis, Mutant Year Zero and Tales from the Loop. Hex map exploration in a post apocalypse land, brutal combat, magic and stronghold building.

The big box set lands imminently. The PDFs tell me this is an excellent if deadly game, with a super premise and delicious looking gameplay. Lots of adventure material means that I get to bring it to the table quickly.



I'm aiming to start in the latter part of December.

Yes, I am excited.

Continue reading...
 

First Age

D&D h@ck3r
Staff member
#4
No thud yet, it can't come soon enough.

The PDFs are keeping me amused. Pages 196 to 200 in the Players Handbook will be heavily used?!
 
#9
I’m already considering creating an adventuring family so after a few sessions I’ll be playing my initial character’s wife’s cousin or some such :)
 
#10
I too am really looking forward to running Forbidden Lands at some point. Its a truely excellent game

In response to Remi's post I'm not sure how to describe the level of lethal.

My recent one-shots of both Tachyon Squadron and D&D 5e have both had higher head counts (TPKs), but the players see those coming. You see a steady loss of resources, hit points run out, or you choose to put everything on the line by playing your last fate chip (which in Tachyon Squadron is your safety line).

By contrast Forbidden Lands gives little warning - you try to cast a spell, roll badly and get ripped into another dimension and out of the campaign, you try to push yourself and manage to cripple yourself pulling a muscle and are swifty defeated, or you roll and discover the arrow pierced a lung. Forgotten Realms feels dangerous even if the death toll doesn't seem to be that much higher.

However a word of warning. Make absolutely sure you have a healer in the party. There is nothing worse than getting a gut wound which will kill you in 8 hours without medical attention, days from the nearest town, and realising you managed to create a party without a healer. There are a lot of slow avoidable deaths in Forbidden Lands - if you have a good healer.
 

First Age

D&D h@ck3r
Staff member
#11
However a word of warning. Make absolutely sure you have a healer in the party. There is nothing worse than getting a gut wound which will kill you in 8 hours without medical attention, days from the nearest town, and realising you managed to create a party without a healer. There are a lot of slow avoidable deaths in Forbidden Lands - if you have a good healer.
Check!! :eek:

It might also make a good convention game?
 
#12
Check!! :eek:

It might also make a good convention game?
Well curiously at Furnace I gave the players a bunch of characters (11 in all) to pick from and they didnt pick either of the two healers. I did however say that if anyone died they could pick one of the remaining characters and we wouldn't question how they had suddenly appeared with the party.
Later we had 3 characters mortally wounded, one with a life expectancy in hours, one who might survive 30 minutes and one with meer minutes on the clock.

The first one died, came back as the Druid (one of the two healer characters), realised they only had enough magic to save one of the two remaining mortally wounded characters - tried a mundane healing skill, succeeded on one, failed on the other (in the process dropping his life expectancy from hours to minutes), and then used magic to save his life.
 

Guvnor

Administrator
Staff member
#13
Doesn't sound at all like the kind of game that suits the usual temperament of Taverners. I am genuinely puzzled by the buzz about this.
 

First Age

D&D h@ck3r
Staff member
#14
Well curiously at Furnace I gave the players a bunch of characters (11 in all) to pick from and they didnt pick either of the two healers. I did however say that if anyone died they could pick one of the remaining characters and we wouldn't question how they had suddenly appeared with the party.
Good tip, I'll have at least one healer spare ready to go, but will ensure there is at least one healer in the group.

Takes me back to my D&D days, when you really had to have some clerical cure light wounds knocking around or there could be a bit of bother.
 

Dom

SuperMunchkin
#15
Doesn't sound at all like the kind of game that suits the usual temperament of Taverners. I am genuinely puzzled by the buzz about this.
I think that the Fria Ligan engine has a lot of love, and the setting feels much more Fighting Fantasy than D&D, so it doesn't surprise me. I am surprised that it is so lethal, but I guess there are ways you could tweak this if you prefer it more epic heroic than gritty lethal heroic.
 
#16
Doesn't sound at all like the kind of game that suits the usual temperament of Taverners. I am genuinely puzzled by the buzz about this.
If it is like the game system in Tales from the Loop then it is a bit swingy.
Players can roll nine dice 🎲 during a conflict resolution and fail to roll any sixes, what’s needed to succeed. Nine dice means that a character defining ability is being used and being brought to bare on an obstacle.
Players could also roll just a single dice 🎲 and roll a six. A success! A single dice means a very minor ability or a handicapped ability is being used.

Of course with such a swing in results it means that both success and failure need to be interesting to the players and not halt the narrative play at all.
 

First Age

D&D h@ck3r
Staff member
#17
I think that the Fria Ligan engine has a lot of love, and the setting feels much more Fighting Fantasy than D&D, so it doesn't surprise me. I am surprised that it is so lethal, but I guess there are ways you could tweak this if you prefer it more epic heroic than gritty lethal heroic.
Yes, quite so. It has an RQish lethality, a Fighting Fantasy feel in the D&D vein, some funky mechanics in a nicely realised setup.

But hey, I'm just frothing, I'm looking forward to seeing how it plays out. Box not here yet..
 
#18
The main thing about the Fria Ligan system (Mutant, In the Loop, Forbidden Lands etc) is that you can push your rolls (i.e. roll some dice again) at the risk you take some loss of attributes in so doing and are you prepared to risk that to succeed? So it's a bit of push your luck type mechanics. Ok, you could roll 9 dice, get no 6s or 1s, reroll all 9 and still get none, but that's a pretty low chance. It's when you've rolled a couple of 1s on the initial roll and no 6s that you then have to have a serious think about if you take the reroll or not...
 
#19
BTW, we played 10+ sessions of Mutant and had no deaths, although there were times when people were broken (i.e. had an attribute go to zero) and it required some party scrambling to get them back up. From a quick read through FL looks pretty similar
 
Last edited:

Guvnor

Administrator
Staff member
#20
So, is FL more like a quick gen, quick death, don't fret about emotional attachment to your character, the hexes are as important as the party?
 
Top