[generic] RPG a day lockdown #29

#4
Prime Directive (Task Force Games' Star Trek RPG) because it's insanely complex, and while I've often enjoyed military orientated Trek on screen (e.g. Balance of Terror, Face of the Enemy, the war against the Dominion in DS9) the game's relentless focus on everyone scrapping with everyone else is boring in a deeply soulless way.
 
#6
I'd say, "Never say never", as in recent years I've run Worlds of Wonder, DragonQuest and other nostalgic momentoes that I never expected to bring to the table (thanks to Chris and Grogmeet for that).

Of what I have, there are plenty I've bought for "research purposes", but they might yet see the table.

Pathfinder 2e is unlikely - purchased because I liked the change in format and appreciate the publication, but unlikely to ever play or GM.

Dangerous Journeys is an anomaly I appreciate for being one of Gygax's bad ideas - the game that couldn't be D&D for legal reasons.

Paranoia (Rebooted) purchased for completeness, having written for PARANOIA XP and loved 2nd edition; I even have it in French, because the edition is gorgeous.

I daresay other games will come to mind. Maybe I'll pop back every now and again as additions occur to me.
 
#7
I've pared down my game collect to mostly the things I use, but there are a few things that still survive regardless. One that I've had for ages and which I am positive I will never have any desire to run or even play is called "Warp World".

"Warp World" is a messy post-apocalyptic, cross-genre mish-mash on the line of Torg or Rift. I have to original version. It has some of the most complex rules I've ever seen. We're talking late-80s, hardcore complex. I don't do even moderately crunchy.

The only reason I keep it is that I like the illustrations. They aren't even that remarkable, just the usual Darrell Midgette. But he uses the same set of very distinctive characters in most of the illustratons through out the book. This creates the illusion of an epic story that is way more interesting than the actuall setting fluff.

I think kind of think my fixation with post-apocalyptic roleplaying is at least in part due to artwork in WarpWorld. That and the "Thundarr The Barbarian" cartoons.
 
#8
Since following the wisdom of Marie Kondo, I no longer keep printed editions of any games that I will not run or play, these are considered dead on arrival, (a few undead ones could still remain if they get one round of play). Mostly, for truly dead books, I just keep the PDFs for those where I received both PDF and print from a Kickstarter.

A useful technique I employ is grouping my collection using Football League Analogies, my Premier League Shelf is safe and contains multiple copies of some, because of both normal and collector's editions, so the Modiphius 2d20 games live here, Pathfinder, D&D, Savage Worlds, Star Wars, the d100 Warhammer 40K from Fantasy Flight Games and recently a lot of Fria Ligan's YZE games.

My Champions League Shelf has games, that I enjoy, but do not get much time to play, so Bruce Cordell's The Strange boxset lives here. Sadly, so does Warhammer Fantasy Role Play (both 3rd and 4th editions). Basically, all Cypher have been dropped to this shelf triggered by Monte Cook's overpriced Ptolus Kickstarter, when I failed to convince myself to splurge 150 US Dollars on that single printed book.

My Relegation Bookshelf is the one that holds games at risk of getting a visit from Marie Kondo. The Sword and Soul, African inspired game Ki Khanga has recently been pushed here, ever since I found out about a d100 OpenQuest version, so less enthused about the original card-based Blackjack version I currently own.

For example, from the Relegation shelf, I let go of beautiful games like Wade Dyer's Fragged Empire (a d6 game but with too much miniatures combat rules encoded in the traits (sort of like D&D and Pathfinder feats). I hope they guy in Germany enjoys it, since he took everything, including the adventure booklets.

Finally, the Undead League are those games I keep in print because there is no PDF available for them. A few undead Kickstarters lie in a state of undeath here, not even on a bookshelf, more like boxed up since I will not pull them out for a long time, unless to offer them as sacrifice to Marie Kondo. For example, the dead trees of Orbis Terrarum are kept just because of the art of Gary Chaulk, of Lone Wolf fame.

To clarify, my "undead books", get one round of play, but sometimes that is all they get for a long time. My truly dead books never get played before they are sacrificed on the altar to the goddess of decluttering.
 
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First Age

D&D h@ck3r and Hopepunk
Staff member
#9
Like Paul, I'm a "never say never" kind of a GM, and am holding out on quite a few that I still think might fly. However...

Weapon of the Gods - I couldn't understand it.
Sixty Mile Sky - I have lots that do this SF thing already
Grimm - like it but think it might have passed me by (I could still be wrong with this one)
Atlantis Second Age - I am more likely to use Conan 2d20 or BoL
Hellas - World of Sun and Stone - Greek SF done well

I like the Omni system, but it seems no.
 
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#10
I have a lot of games in my collection that I will probably never play, but I hold out hope. There are just a few that I have no intention of playing, and indeed bought knowing that I had no intention of playing.

- Cyborg Commando.
What is it? The first game Gary Gygax published after leaving TSR, it's some sort of alien invasion SF thing. Even at the time (mid-late 80s) it got lousy reviews. One thing interesting about it, it uses a d10 x d10 dice roll for task resolution, leading to an even bigger headache than d6 x d6!
Why do I have it? Purely for historical interest.

- Superhero: 2044
What is it? The first superhero game, apparently, from way back in 1977. I actually struggled to find the game in there, but then it doesn't matter because I don't intend to play it.
Why do I have it? Well, partly for historical interest, as above, and partly because I came across it in a Being and Buy the same week the author died. I am a sentimental old fool, you see.

- Dungeons & Dragons, 4th Edition
What is it? Really? Where have you been?
Why do I have it? Well, Borders was shutting down and selling the core books for £10 each, and I love a bargain. At the time I hadn't played a version of D&D newer than AD&D2e, and I thought I would have a look and see what all the moaning was about.
 
#11
- Dungeons & Dragons, 4th Edition
What is it? Really? Where have you been?
Why do I have it? Well, Borders was shutting down and selling the core books for £10 each, and I love a bargain. At the time I hadn't played a version of D&D newer than AD&D2e, and I thought I would have a look and see what all the moaning was about.
I got a slipcase set of Dungeons and Dragons 4th Edition. That edition is the most unloved at almost any bring-and-buy event, except for the Dark Sun Setting. I wanted to make 4th Edition my Dark Sun setting, but could not get all the books, few that there were anyway. I just use D&D4e for my fantasy chess tabletop skirmish game on my Giant Book of Battle Mats grid. The at-will effects if 4th Edition are pretty neat, and moving on a grid squares works well with the way 4th Edition movement rules were written.
 
#12
4th Edition Dungeons and Dragons and Chess
Thought, I would get insights into whether my translations were close enough. Okay, this turns DnD4e into a skirmish game, but it is still fun.

8x Pawns - Fighter class (obviously) Level 1
2x Bishops - Cleric class (also obvious) Level 2
2x Knights - Paladin class (also obvious) Level 2

2x Rooks - Warlock class (not sure but seems right) Level 2
Queen - Wizard class (seems right) Level 3
King - Warlord class (because Bard is missing in core PHB rules of DnD4e) Level 1

You may notice, the Queen is the only Level 3 character. In contrast the King is the only back row piece still at Level 1.
 
#13
- Superhero: 2044
What is it? The first superhero game, apparently, from way back in 1977. I actually struggled to find the game in there, but then it doesn't matter because I don't intend to play it.
Take a reread. If you have the colour cover, ignore all the stuff in the back section. Skip anything that looks like game rules. Just reread the setting material and marvel at how much Donald Saxman managed to cram into such a small space. Textbook “how to justify Superheroes” stuff. NEVER try to play the game but DO convert the setting for another system. It’s great.
 
#14
Lone Wolf. Looks lovely and appears pretty simple. But I've also got Adventures in Middle Earth and I'd much rather play that (although I have heavily trashed the 5e rules to bring them closer to the simplicity of an earlier edition).
 
#16
WFRP 3e
Occasionally, I open the box, shudder at the amount of stuff in there and then close it up again
It is pretty good for kids. All those pieces of cardboard for the hero pix and all the beasties and the tokens for wounds were a hit with the younger ones for whom I ran a one-shot months back before the lockdown crisis of social confidence.
 
#17
My immediate thought is GURPS - though I'm there for the sourcebooks.

There are more I'm not likely to run, but in some cases I would play with absolute glee.
 
#19
Trail of Cthulhu - beautiful book, and I get the basic principles of the GUMSHOE system, but they seem to be qualified by an endless series of exceptions and special cases. Far too fiddly to be playable, for me as GM anyway. I will say that I've been a player in a game and thought it was ok. Would be willing to give Trail... another try as an investigator, but no way would I want to run it.
 
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#20
Trail of Cthulhu - beautiful book, and I get the basic principles of the GUMSHOE system, but they seem to be qualified by an endless series of exceptions and special cases. Far too fiddly to be playable, for me as GM anyway. I will say that I've been a player in a game and thought it was ok. Would be willing to give Trail... another try as an investigator, but no way would I want to it.
You might find that the newer wave of Gumshoe books (ie the ones starting to become available now) have improved this. I never read Trail, but I think they've gained experience of how the system works in play and it's settled into a form that focuses on the important bits. (Perhaps I should say I've done a bit of editing work for them.)
 
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