Other Games Coming Soon... The Troubleshooters RPG

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#1
This looks really fresh and fun...

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Welcome to The Troubleshooters, an action-adventure tabletop roleplaying game of international mystery. Inspired by European comics, The Troubleshooters will take you all across the world for exciting adventures!

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The Troubleshooters tabletop roleplaying game will take the characters to the mid-1960s all over Europe and across the world. They will find themselves at exotic locations, glittering metropoles, deep in the wilderness, or even in cozy country villages, where they face horrible foes: spies, wild beasts, mafia, mad scientists, villains, and relatives! The characters, ranging from athletes and explorers to journalists and inventors, are drawn into other people’s troubles and band together to solve them.

The Troubleshooters starts in 1965 in a world similar to but not exactly like our own. There are extra countries like San Angelo, Sitomeyang, Katsuichi or Arenwald. There are valleys that time forgot, mysterious temples hidden in the jungle, and secret laboratories beneath museums. The Concorde is already flying and carrying passengers, France is planning for high speed railways, Americans and Soviets have space stations in orbit around Earth, and a Japanese-French atomic rocket landed on the Moon in 1964. Still, Europe is divided by the Iron Curtain, there is no internet and no Google (you have to go to a library or an archive to look up stuff), and most people have just one telephone connected to a landline.

This world is threatened by the evil organisation The Octopus, trying to upend the fragile balance between the Eastern Bloc and the Western Alliance. Led by graf von Zadrith, The Octopus is just emerging from the shadows, ready to shape the world in their image.

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Your character is part of a group of friends to whom adventures happen – and you gladly participate. No matter if it is a hunt for a lost treasure, helping someone get their inheritance, stopping spies from stealing military secrets, or foiling The Octopus’ evil plans for world domination, you just go on adventure.

The Troubleshooters is designed from the ground up to fit the genre. It has a skill-based system where task checks are made by rolling a d%/d100 and compare against a skill value.

There are no classes or levels in The Troubleshooters. There are about a dozen templates which showcase typical characters and assign appropriate skill values, Abilities, Complications, and gear kits to your character.

A smart plot hook system is used to kick off adventures, all but guaranteeing that at least one character has something to do with the plot from start. Much of the game is centred around the Story Point economy. You gain points from making extraordinary rolls, activating Complications, and getting captured by the villain. You spend points to flip task checks, establish new things in the game, and to activate Abilities.

It is hard to die in The Troubleshooters. Instead, you choose between being Out Cold, Wounded or in Mortal Peril. It’s only when you’re in Mortal Peril that you actually risk dying. However, it is easy to get captured by the evil villains and have to suffer their gloating while they tell you their evil plans.
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https://www.kickstarter.com/project...-tabletop-rpg?ref=profile_saved_projects_live
 
#2
It looks pretty cool for a child-friendly take on roleplaying in the classic era of those Tintin comic books.

I wish the Troubleshooters had a more heroic dice resolution system instead of the percentages of d100, which is what the Quickstart reveals. This seems very old school, but maybe that was whole design purpose of the dice mechanics. The modifiers using "pips" can get confusing though:

If an action has a modifier, check the Ones. If the Ones are between 1 and a negative modifier (i.e. −1 or −2 for a modifier of −2 pips), the task check fails regardless of whether the roll is lower than the skill value. If the Ones are between 1 and a positive modifier (i.e 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 for a +5 pips modifier), the check succeed
Another part that could be confusing is the funky "pips" system below for actions tagged with negative modifiers: But there’s something wrong with Elektra’s Lancia, and Éloïse is trying to fix it. Luckily, she has a Mechanic’s Toolbox, which gives her a +2 pips modifier when repairing something. Éloïse has Engineering 45%, and rolls 81. The task check is a success even if 81 is higher than 45, because the Ones of her roll (1) is within 1 and 2 from the +2 pips modifier. She quickly identifies the problem as loose tube clamps at the cooler, fixes them and fills up the cooler with water.
Also, in the example, instead of Eloise trying the fix, Elektra may have had a better chance with a 65% skill in Engineering. But those "pips" can throw a curveball anyway.

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Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#3
If you read pips as modifiers then you're doing it wrong. I did originally and got confused.

It threw me last night when I read it, but I've got my head around it now:

A normal difficulty roll is a straight percentile die roll.

However, a more difficult roll (negative pips) comes with an instant chance of failing and an easier roll (positive pips) comes with an instant chance of success.
  • You make the straight percentile roll but you first check the 'ones' dice.
  • If you roll equal too or under the number of pips you either get instant success or failure. If this doesn't happen, you read the dice normally.
The explanation isn't good and it's pretty unique. As difficulties step in two pip jumps, it basically means you have a 20% / 40% etc chance of instant failure or success if the task is outside the norm. If this doesn't happen then it's resolved normally. It uses the ones dice to decouple from the tens dice which dominates in the normal roll.

It's clever, but I can't intuitively see the probability the way I can with a normal dice or 2D6 curve. I think it's really clear you need to be looking for equipment or some other way of helping to get you the chance of instant success. It is operating a more heroic option really.
 

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#5
If you read pips as modifiers then you're doing it wrong. I did originally and got confused.

It threw me last night when I read it, but I've got my head around it now:

A normal difficulty roll is a straight percentile die roll.

However, a more difficult roll (negative pips) comes with an instant chance of failing and an easier roll (positive pips) comes with an instant chance of success.
  • You make the straight percentile roll but you first check the 'ones' dice.
  • If you roll equal too or under the number of pips you either get instant success or failure. If this doesn't happen, you read the dice normally.
The explanation isn't good and it's pretty unique. As difficulties step in two pip jumps, it basically means you have a 20% / 40% etc chance of instant failure or success if the task is outside the norm. If this doesn't happen then it's resolved normally. It uses the ones dice to decouple from the tens dice which dominates in the normal roll.

It's clever, but I can't intuitively see the probability the way I can with a normal dice or 2D6 curve. I think it's really clear you need to be looking for equipment or some other way of helping to get you the chance of instant success. It is operating a more heroic option really.
Screenshot 2020-05-21 at 13.52.35.png

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1CXJZqUpM8gJ51Bf-V4OvrCNPxb-h-fuHzB98rMKHevk/edit?usp=sharing

I've knocked up what I think is the probability of success above, but I'm sure someone like @dr_mitch could confirm if it is correct!

The system really benefits low skills if you can get positive pips. It doesn't penalise low skills as badly.
 

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#6
First impression from just these posts: it sounds like an awkward way of doing things, by someone who maybe needed to experience more rulesets (and explain better!).
The explanation could be better but I think the issue is that it's conceptually very different to a lot of engines and not how we assume that d% games work. It's quite clever.

When I read it last night it jarred, but having taken time to re-read it, I'm actually impressed.
 
#7
@Dom I was going to say that your spreadsheet calc format could exceed probability 1 and you'd need to write them as, eg, F2 = 1 - (0.6 * 0.95). But the results seem to be the same anyway! (Yours would break at higher pip values.) (Ed: ah, no they won't, beg yer pardon.)
 
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#8
If you read pips as modifiers then you're doing it wrong. I did originally and got confused.
...
However, a more difficult roll (negative pips) comes with an instant chance of failing and an easier roll (positive pips) comes with an instant chance of success.
  • You make the straight percentile roll but you first check the 'ones' dice.
  • If you roll equal too or under the number of pips you either get instant success or failure. If this doesn't happen, you read the dice normally.
...
Great observation, Dom. I think the rules need some re-wording.

Basically there are two mechanics at play

(a) The PIPS effect
So whenever a task has a "pips" chance for success or failure, first focus on reading the low-d10 die (the "ones" die).
A "negatives pips" modifier means you fail immediately if your low-d10 (1 to 9) die equals or less than pips value.
A "positive pips" modifier means you succeed immediately your low-d10 (1 to 9) die equals or less than pips value.

Only if the above cannot resolve your success or failure, then move to the (b) rule below.

(b) The Standard effect
Just read the d100 percent normally using both d10 dice.
 
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#9
If I read the rules right, and your table above, for positive 2pips, you get extra success on rolls of 1,2, 11, 12, 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, 51, 52, 62, 62, 71, 72, 81, 82, 91, 92 (that is 20 out of 100 bonus).
Similarly, for negative 2pips, you have an extra 20% chance of failure.

So for negative pips an additional 20% chance of failure on 5% drops your base rate to 4% only.

Does that mean this negated base rate becomes the new default base rate?
Hence, for positive percentages on 2pips, you use the 4% base added to the calculated 20% bonus.

Okay, I see, that is the only way the positive modifiers say blow 100, by altering the base rate when pips are involved.
 
#10
Might have to carry the chart along like in old school D&D to help decide whether a character with a higher percentage skill but lacking pip-bonus is better or worse than another character one with a lower skill but blessed by positive pips on a task.
 

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#11
Might have to carry the chart along like in old school D&D to help decide whether a character with a higher percentage skill but lacking pip-bonus is better or worse than another character one with a lower skill but blessed by positive pips on a task.
I don't understand why. The skill column gives skills from 5% to 95%.
Base case is no pips.
You just look up the different reference points.
 

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#12
@Dom I was going to say that your spreadsheet calc format could exceed probability 1 and you'd need to write them as, eg, F2 = 1 - (0.6 * 0.95). But the results seem to be the same anyway! (Yours would break at higher pip values.) (Ed: ah, no they won't, beg yer pardon.)
Here are the probability trees for what I’m doing

positive 2 pips followed by negative two pips
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